Friday, April 28, 2017

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

COMMON INSECTICIDE AFFECTS BEE'S ABILITY TO FLY

Here is a report that documents/suggests that neonictinoids DO affect honey bees in a very negative way.  This particular pesticide is used on corn, soybeans and cotton.

https://phys.org/news/2017-04-common-pesticide-honey-bee-ability.html

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

STRONG HIVE? TIME FOR A DIVIDE?

If you have been out checking your hives you may have noticed that many overwintered hives are extremely strong.  I have already seen capped queen cells in one of my hives.  This means they will probably swarm when weather permits and the honey flow starts.  Usually this is about mid May, but may be slightly sooner this year.  So its time to think of doing a DIVIDE.  A good description of the process of doing a divide can be found at the following link.

http://naturesnectar.blogspot.com/

Sunday, April 23, 2017

FIRST TIME

ECWBA President Gerard being a good mentor while guiding new ECWBA member Diedre through installation of her first package of bees.  Looks like they both have new white protective gear.  

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Friday, April 21, 2017

ANOTHER WAY TO APPLY OXALIC ACID TO CONTROL VARROA

Here is another method of applying oxalic acid.  I don't know if this method is EPA/FDA/??? approved.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrWf2QqjlaE

TREATMENT FREE BEEKEEPING EXPLAINED

New beekeepers are frequently enamored with the concept of treatment free beekeeping.  The following link provides a description of "treatment free" beekeeping.  New beekeepers should be aware of several facts/requirements if they are to be successful with treatment free philospohy.

First the link:
http://www.keepingbackyardbees.com/treatment-free-beekeeping-explained/


1.  Do not attempt to start treatment free beekeeping using package bees and queens.  These bees are not adapted to our climate and they are from stock raised under a "treatment intensive" regime.  In a few short words these bees are unlikely to survive without continued treatment or in our harsh winter conditions.  Replacing your annual losses will be both financially and psychologically difficult.

2. Get local bees that have been raised in the treatment free regime for a number of years.  They may cost more but will survive better than package bees. Or capture wild swarms; at least you know awild swarm has most likely survived at least one Wisconsin winter.

3. Be prepared for winter loss rates approaching 50% or more for the first several years.

4. Never replace your losses with package bees.  Split your survivor colonies which have shown the ability to survive.